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Gov. Martinez (R-NM): Rape Victims Now Must Prove Their Rape Was “Forcible” In Order To Receive Government Assistance [UPDATED]

facebook Gov. Martinez (R NM): Rape Victims Now Must Prove Their Rape Was Forcible In Order To Receive Government Assistance  [UPDATED] twitter Gov. Martinez (R NM): Rape Victims Now Must Prove Their Rape Was Forcible In Order To Receive Government Assistance  [UPDATED] tumblr Gov. Martinez (R NM): Rape Victims Now Must Prove Their Rape Was Forcible In Order To Receive Government Assistance  [UPDATED]

According to proposed changes to New Mexico’s official applications for childcare assistance, women who wish to receive childcare assistance from the state without having to contact the child’s father must prove that “the child was conceived as a result of incest or forcible rape.” If your child was instead the result of you being roofied and then sexually assaulted, well, you’re going to have to have some really uncomfortable conversations with your non-forcible rapist. Awk-ward!!!  Oh man, this could totally be the plot of a sit-com episode. Remind us to write that down in our idea book. Comedy gold.

untitled4 Gov. Martinez (R NM): Rape Victims Now Must Prove Their Rape Was Forcible In Order To Receive Government Assistance  [UPDATED]

Gov. Susana Martinez (R-NM)

We kid. Actually, it’s really awful. Under New Mexico law, women seeking childcare assistance must prove that they have done everything possible to obtain child support from the father of the child. Under the proposed changes, in order to be exempt from this requirement, women must show they were victims of “forcible rape.”  In other words, if, for some reason, a woman’s magical uterus fails to protect her from becoming impregnanted from a legitimate rape, as it is designed by God to do, and she elects to give birth to the child, she will be forced under the proposed changes in the law to prove not only that she was raped but also the manner in which she was raped in order to receive childcare assistance.

This is the second time Governor Susana Martinez (R) has backed the use of the “forcible rape” language in recent months. A March 2012 proclamation signed by Martinez declared April as New Mexico’s Sexual Assault Awareness Month — yayyy, that sounds really nice!!! — but specifically excludes children and other victims who were not “forcibly raped” — ohhhh, that’s not so nice:

WHEREAS, FIFTEEN PERCENT OF NEW MEXICAN ADULTS HAVE BEEN FORCIBLY RAPED AT LEAST ONCE IN THEIR LIFETIMES….

A hearing on the proposed changes to the child care policy is scheduled for October 1 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

[UPDATE:  The Huffington Post now reports that Gov. Martinez has asked her administration to remove the "forcible rape" language. Spokesman Enrique Knell called the language "redundant, unnecessary, and she doesn't support its usage." Knell said the CYFD had used the term "forcible rape" because the FBI still uses it. However, the FBI stopped using that definition in early January, before the changes to the policy were proposed and before the Governor's sexual assault proclamation.]/

facebook Gov. Martinez (R NM): Rape Victims Now Must Prove Their Rape Was Forcible In Order To Receive Government Assistance  [UPDATED] twitter Gov. Martinez (R NM): Rape Victims Now Must Prove Their Rape Was Forcible In Order To Receive Government Assistance  [UPDATED] tumblr Gov. Martinez (R NM): Rape Victims Now Must Prove Their Rape Was Forcible In Order To Receive Government Assistance  [UPDATED]

6 Responses to Gov. Martinez (R-NM): Rape Victims Now Must Prove Their Rape Was “Forcible” In Order To Receive Government Assistance [UPDATED]

  1. Tracey

    at

    So… she's promoting the Republican agenda by encouraging people who are non-forcibly raped to get an abortion?

    • Linda (The Daily Dolt)

      Linda the Dolt

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      I've thought about this, and the only explanation I can come up with is that she is trying to make the "forcible rape" language more prevalent so it can be used in other contexts. It just makes no sense that she would want a 14 year old girl to contact the 40 year old father of her child (which, if he's convicted, is probably prohibited by law).

  2. Adrienne Young

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    She has now removed the word forcible. But in the proclamation amendment she wants to add that all women who are raped and ask for assistance which in New Mexico they are, you not only have to prove you were raped through a "test" but you have to get the rapist to pay you child support or else you are ineligible. Be a voice sign the petition! http://www.thepetitionsite.com/736/662/116/susana

  3. Pastor LN

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    The word "rape" says it all:

    1: an act or instance of robbing or despoiling or carrying away a person by force

    2: unlawful sexual activity and usually sexual intercourse carried out forcibly or under threat of injury against the will usually of a female or with a person who is beneath a certain age or incapable of valid consent — compare sexual assault, statutory rape

    3: an outrageous violation

    (from Mirriam Webster Dictionary)

  4. statutoryman

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    Regardless of what your short-form dictonary says, the other kind of rape is "statutory."

    This information is taken from

    http://www.cga.ct.gov/2003/olrdata/jud/rpt/2003-r

    Most states do not refer specifically to statutory rape; instead they use designations such as sexual assault and sexual abuse to identify prohibited activity. Regardless of the designation, these crimes are based on the premise that until a person reaches a certain age, he is legally incapable of consenting to sexual intercourse. Thus, instead of including force as a criminal element, theses crimes make it illegal for anyone to engage in sexual intercourse with anyone below a certain age, other than his spouse. The age of consent varies by state, with most states, including Connecticut, setting it at age 16. The age of consent in other states ranges from ages 14 to 18.

    Some states base the penalty for violations on the age of the offender, with older offenders receiving harsher penalties. For example, California, Maryland, Missouri, Nevada, and New York reserve their harshest statutory rape penalty for offenders who are age 21 or older.

  5. matt

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    It sounds like this likely was a case of inadvertent inclusion. But it also highlights the importance of language and specific word choice in the political debate. Without question this is something that the GOP understands at the highest level, and effective control of words and language has been a hallmark of GOP policies for four decades.